HIRE A VETERAN PROJECT

Hire Smart, Hire Veterans

Living your best Coast Guard life « Coast Guard All Hands

Living your best Coast Guard life « Coast Guard All Hands

Once a month, Coast Guard All Hands will feature “Dear Coast Guard Family,” a column for Coast Guard families by Coast Guard spouse Rachel Conley. Rachel is married to her high school sweetheart, Chief Warrant Officer James Conley, and is the mother of three children. Rachel passionately serves as a Coast Guard Ombudsman and advocate of Coast Guard families. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the United States Coast Guard Ombudsman of the Year Award.

Written by Rachel Conley

I can’t tell you that the days will always be easy – life is full of ups and downs, but hopefully, those trials and tribulations will make us stronger in the end.

When I met my husband (way back in high school), he had already made the decision to enlist in the Coast Guard. I knew from the very beginning that a life with him would also mean a life as a Coast Guard spouse. To be honest, I never thought twice, and just over 18 years ago I told him goodbye as he left for basic training. Eighteen years ago I had no idea what being a Coast Guard spouse would mean – we were young and dating at the time – but, today, I do. Today, I also know what it’s like to be a mother. I know what it’s like to stand on a pier, holding our children, while watching a cutter disappear into the distance. And, I know that as the cutter moves towards the horizon or as the plane departs, I will have to pick up our children and walk away. In that moment, I know that I have the ability to make the difference. I comfort, I reassure, I stand strong.

In

Read the rest
Navy’s First Certified Emergency Manager Protects NAS Kingsville

Navy’s First Certified Emergency Manager Protects NAS Kingsville

NAVAL AIR STATION KINGSVILLE, Texas (NNS) — Dave Yeager says becoming a Certified Navy Emergency Manager was a goal he had for almost a decade.

Yeager, emergency manager for Naval Air Station Kingsville,not only achieved it, but is the first emergency manager certified under a Navy program established in January 2017.

“I guess you could say I was the guinea pig for the certification process,” he said.

“I’m very proud to say the Navy now has an emergency management certification program for emergency management specialists. And there are some really, really good ones out there.”

Yeager was presented the certification in a ceremony Dec. 13.

This is the first time Department of Defense has pushed certification for emergency managers under a DoD program instead of outside civilian organizations. Navy Installations Command issued guidance in January.

Requirements include at least three years of experience as an emergency manager, multiple training certificates and advanced training.

“Most of the stuff I already had, it was just a matter of pulling it into one location,” he said. “There were five initial submissions; I guess I was the first one to make it all the way through the process.

“Now that we know what the process is, I’m sharing that with everybody.

“I’m not going to get a pay raise, I’m not going to get any awards, but this has been a personal goal for me for a long time.”

Certification guidelines are stringent and there are no waivers, Yeager said. Certification is good for five years.

“Emergency managers are those guys behind the curtain, pulling the strings, is the easiest way to explain it,” Yeager said. “We’re the guys that first plan for emergencies, then we coordinate the responses for those emergencies.”

The primary focus is on ensuring those responding to the emergency have

Read the rest
Joint Typhoon Warning Center Increases Warnings and Improves Graphics

Joint Typhoon Warning Center Increases Warnings and Improves Graphics

PEARL HARBOR (NNS) — The first warning on a Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone was issued Nov. 29, 2017 by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Dahlia (Tropical Storm 01S) was the first Southern Hemisphere system where warnings were issued every six hours without higher authority request.

Previously, manpower constraints limited updating warnings to every 12 hours but with the training of two more typhoon duty forecasters and innovative internal business practices, JTWC is now capable of six-hourly warnings regardless of their location in the ocean.

“This periodicity change of warnings specifically enables the U.S. Pacific Command and its components greater fidelity of information on systems threatening their assets, enabling better informed decisions,” said Cmdr. Jillene Bushnell, the commanding officer of JTWC. “The previous gap between warnings would regularly result in larger changes in tropical cyclone fix, intensity and forecast track based on a longer interval between forecasts in a chaotic environment. Matching our forecast accuracy and periodicity throughout our assigned Pacific and Indian Ocean regions is extremely important to me.”

JTWC releases warnings on tropical cyclones above 35 knot (40 mph) wind speeds in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Products include a graphic of the tropical cyclone depicting the historical and predicted track, wind speed, and the radius of gale (34 knot), destructive (50 knot), and typhoon (64 knot) strength winds. In addition to the graphic, the products include an explanation of the current environmental situation and forecast philosophy; a text product listing the track, wind speed, and wind radii information in six hour intervals; a satellite image showing the tropical cyclone’s center position at the time of the warning; and a Google Earth overlay.

During the 2016 season, JTWC warned on 20 tropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. During February 2016, the strongest Southern Hemisphere

Read the rest
ONR Announces Successful Final Helicopter Autonomous Flight Demonstration

ONR Announces Successful Final Helicopter Autonomous Flight Demonstration

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. (NNS) — Autonomy options for the Marine Corps have taken a major step forward, as ONR officials announced Dec. 13, a successful final helicopter flight demonstration with autonomous capability at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, part of the Autonomous Aerial Cargo/Utility System (AACUS) program.

AACUS is a partnership between the Office of Naval Research and technology company Aurora Flight Sciences and will enable the Marine Corps to rapidly resupply forces on the front lines using cutting-edge technology sponsored by ONR.

The system consists of a sensor and software package that can be integrated into any manned or unmanned rotary-wing aircraft to detect and avoid obstacles (like telephone wires, other vehicles or large ground objects) in unfavorable weather conditions or to facilitate autonomous, unmanned flight. This capability will be a welcome alternative to dangerous convoys or manned aircraft missions in all types of weather.

“This is more than just an unmanned helicopter,” said Dr. Walter Jones, ONR executive director. “AACUS is an autonomy kit that can be placed on any rotary-wing platform and provide it with an autonomous capability. Imagine a Marine Corps unit deployed in a remote location, in rough terrain, needing ammunition, water, batteries or even blood.”

“With AACUS, an unmanned helicopter takes the supplies from the base, picks out the optimal route and best landing site closest to the warfighters, lands and returns to base once the resupply is complete-all with the single touch of a handheld tablet.”

The need for this capability surfaced during Marine Corps operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, experts say. Cargo helicopters and resupply convoys of trucks bringing fuel, food, water, ammunition and medical supplies to the front lines frequently found themselves under fire from adversaries, or the target of roadside bombs and other improvised explosive devices.

AACUS is

Read the rest
Wishing the Men and Women of Naval Aviation Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year

Wishing the Men and Women of Naval Aviation Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year

By Rear Adm. Roy Kelley
Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

I want to wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and a happy holiday season. This is a very special time of year and I hope you are able to enjoy the holiday break and recharge from what has been an exciting year for naval aviation.

Seeing all that has been accomplished in 2017 illustrates to the world that our Navy continues to showcase durability and superiority. We wished fair winds and following seas to the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group as they deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) was awarded the Battle “E” in March for her superior performance and completed sea trials in late July, following an exceptionally executed planned incremental availability. The Navy commissioned our newest aircraft carrier, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), which continues to surpass expectations each time she gets underway.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 28, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The aircraft carrier was underway conducting test and evaluation operations.(U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 28, 2017) An F/A-18F Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 flies over USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The aircraft carrier was underway conducting test and evaluation operations.(U.S. Navy photo by Erik Hildebrandt/Released)

 

Our deploying air wings set operational records while bringing the fight to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Carrier Air Wings 3 and 8 flew a combined 13,247 sorties, delivered 3,110,000 pounds of ordnance, logged 64,268 flight hours and successfully completed 20,868 traps. These are truly staggering numbers that highlight the power and flexibility of naval aviation.

This year’s hurricane season tested our nation’s fortitude. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria devastated parts of the United States, Puerto Rico and the Bahamas. These storms tested our ability to quickly respond to a humanitarian crisis. Within hours of receiving their orders, the Dusty

Read the rest
Getting youth excited about cyber good for everyone, experts say | Article

Getting youth excited about cyber good for everyone, experts say | Article

All-Army CyberStakes award presentation at the 2017 International Conference on Cyber Conflict U.S. took place in the Ronald Reagan Building, Nov. 7, 2017. Pictured here at the event are: (left to right) 1st Lt. Christian Sharpsten, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade, (1st overall); 2nd Lt. Matthew Shockley, U.S. Army Cyber School (2nd overall); and, 2nd Lt. Edward Woodruff, 780th MI Brigade (3rd overall). They are seen with (from left) Lt. Col. Josh Bundt, an instructor of digital forensics and research scientist with the Army Cyber Institute, U.S. Military Academy; Daniel Ragsdale, director of Texas A&M Cybersecurity Center and a professor of practice in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering; and, Dr. David Brumley, the Bosch Security and Privacy professor at Carnegie Mellon University.
1 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – All-Army CyberStakes award presentation at the 2017 International Conference on Cyber Conflict U.S. took place in the Ronald Reagan Building, Nov. 7, 2017. Pictured here at the event are: (left to right) 1st Lt. Christian Sharpsten, 780th Military Intelligence Brigade, (1st overall); 2nd Lt. Matthew Shockley, U.S. Army Cyber School (2nd overall); and, 2nd Lt. Edward Woodruff, 780th MI Brigade (3rd overall). They are seen with (from left) Lt. Col. Josh Bundt, an instructor of digital forensics and research scientist with the Army Cyber Institute, U.S. Military Academy; Daniel Ragsdale, director of Texas A&M Cybersecurity Center and a professor of practice in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering; and, Dr. David Brumley, the Bosch Security and Privacy professor at Carnegie Mellon University. (Photo Credit: Steven P Stover) VIEW ORIGINAL
Midshipmen and cadets from the Navy, Army, Air Force and Coast Guard academies participate in CyberStakes 2016, an annual cutting-edge Defense Department cyber skills competition held in Pittsburgh, Feb. 5-7, 2016.
2 / 2 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Midshipmen and cadets from the Navy, Army, Air Force and Coast Guard academies participate in CyberStakes 2016, an annual cutting-edge Defense Department cyber skills competition held in Pittsburgh, Feb. 5-7, 2016. (Photo Credit: Army) VIEW ORIGINAL

WASHINGTON — The Army offers a number of cyber programs tailored for youth, even those with no interest in being part of the military, said Col. Andrew O. Hall, director of the Army Cyber Institute.

Hall said it’s important that all Soldiers, particularly junior officers, get a grasp of the cyber domain in order to be effective on the battlefield. Additionally, he said that growing a cyber workforce benefits all Americans, since cybersecurity in government and industry is inextricably linked to national security.

Hall and others spoke at an Association of the U.S. Army-sponsored forum on cyber issues, Dec. 13, where they outlined various cyber entry points for youth.

CYBER LEADER DEVELOPMENT

Several years ago, the

Read the rest
When Everything Went Wrong, This F-16 Pilot Did Everything Right

When Everything Went Wrong, This F-16 Pilot Did Everything Right

By Katie Lange
Defense Media Activity

Imagine you’re an F-16 pilot, and your plane goes into catastrophic failure minutes after takeoff, right over heavily populated Washington, D.C. That’s a nightmare scenario one D.C. Air National Guard pilot went through last spring – one that ended with the best possible outcome and earned him an unexpected award.

Capt. Jonathan Morgan was honored in early December with the Flying Safety Award and the Meritorious Service Medal.

Brig. Gen. William J. Walker (left), acting commanding general, District of Columbia National Guard; and Brig. Gen. Jeffrey C. Bozard (right), commander, 113th Wing, D.C. Air National Guard; with Capt. Jonathan R. Morgan, D.C. Air National Guard pilot who was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal on Dec. 3, 2017, during the D.C. National Guard’s annual Awards and Decoration Ceremony at Joint Force Headquarters, Washington, D.C. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Eric Ritter

“I was just doing my job,” he said. “Anyone else in that position would have done the same thing.”

So what, exactly, happened? Captain Morgan – yes, he knows the irony of his name, and he loves it – went through the details with us.

Problems on Problems

On April 5, Morgan and three other F-16 pilots took off from Joint Base Andrews on a training mission to Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania. But as soon as he got airborne, things started to go wrong.

“I see uncontrolled acceleration in my jet,” Morgan said.

As he was troubleshooting that, a much bigger problem arose – his engine gave out. And since the F-16 only has one, as Morgan said, that was a “game changer.” He let the other pilots in formation know what was happening and immediately turned back toward Andrews, scouting the ground for emergency places to land if needed, despite the

Read the rest
JSDF, U.S. military conduct Japanese and U.S. Medical Expert Exchange Event > The Official United States Marine Corps Public Website > News Display

JSDF, U.S. military conduct Japanese and U.S. Medical Expert Exchange Event > The Official United States Marine Corps Public Website > News Display

By Sgt. Tiffany Edwards, 3rd Marine Logistics Group

CAMP NAHA, Okinawa, Japan — U.S. military personnel with 3rd Medical Battalion, 3rd Marine Logistics Group; 18th Medical Group, 18th Wing Support Squadron and U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, attended a presentation and tour given by Japan Ground Self Defense Force soldiers with Medical Department, Ground Staff Office, Western Army, Dec. 12, 2017, at Camp Naha, Okinawa, Japan.

 

U.S. medical personnel were invited to Camp Naha during the Japanese and U.S. Medical Expert Exchange Event, a three-day bilateral training exchange where medical personnel from both militaries learned about each service’s medical training, tactics and procedures.

“We’re working today with the Japan Self Defense Force, building relationships and learning how we are going to manage medical capabilities with amphibious warfare assets,” said U.S. Navy Capt. Raymond Batz, the III Marine Expeditionary Force Surgeon. “It’s absolutely critical to take this opportunity to build relationships.”

The event, in its third iteration since 2015, featured guests of honor such as Maj. Gen. Yasunori Matsuki, the director general of the Medical Department, Ground Staff Office, JGSDF.

“I think the experience is good for strengthening the relationship between the U.S. and Japan,” said Matsuki. “In this sense, this exchange is very valuable for us to learn how to provide that type of medical support.”

The exchange included events on Camp Foster, Camp Hansen and Camp Naha and spanned a course of three days. During the events, U.S. and Japanese medical personnel were able to demonstrate different medical capabilities and scenarios to improve bilateral functionality between the two nations’ militaries.

“We’re able to share our best practices with each other,” said Batz. “We held a lecture on medical logistics and supply regulation, and the JSDF conducted a mass-casualty demonstration, a capabilities brief and a hospital tour.”

U.S. military

Read the rest
Airman Launches Professional Boxing Career > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article

Airman Launches Professional Boxing Career > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article


SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C., Dec. 15, 2017 —
A Florida native, Air Force Tech. Sgt. Andre Penn, serving with the 20th Civil Engineer Squadron here, has been preparing for more than a decade to achieve his dream of becoming a professional boxer.


















“I started boxing when I was 16 years old,” Penn said. “I played basketball, football and track. I did it all, but I loved the individuality of boxing, because in basketball you have a teammate that can miss the ball and it’s their fault. In boxing, it’s all on you.”

Excited by the thought of controlling his own destiny, Penn carried his passion for the sport to his first amateur boxing match at the age of 17.

“My very first fight was almost 17 years ago in Alabama,” Penn said. “I was really nervous and didn’t know what to expect.”

Fortunately, he said, listening to his coach’s insight helped him to be successful in that match, ensuring every command was executed flawlessly.

With the newfound confidence acquired after winning his first match, Penn joined the Air Force.

“After a year of being out of high school, I finally joined,” he said. “My dad was in the Air Force and that was a big reason why I joined the military.”

The Air Force opened up a lot of opportunities for me, Penn said.

In 2006, just two years after enlisting in the Air Force, he joined the Air Force boxing team.

“Joining the team was a goal that I had coming in to the Air Force,” Penn said. “There were a couple of guys at my gym that were on the team, so I knew about the

Read the rest